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Hayom Yom

Hayom-Yom for 1, Iyyar

30 Nisan, 5777 - April 26, 20172 Iyyar, 5777 - April 28, 2017

Hayom Yom was written by the Lubavitcher Rebbe in 5703 (1942-43).
In this box we have listed the Torah Lessons for this year.
The Torah Lessons below in the text are as they were in the original edition.
Thursday, 1 Iyyar, 5777 - April 27, 2017
16th day of the Omer
Torah Lessons
(5777)
Chumash: Sazria-Metzora, 5th portion (Lev. 14:21-14:32) with Rashi.
Tehillim: 1-9
Tanya: English text / Audio / MP3
Rambam:
     3 chapters: Hebrew / Audio / MP3,
     1 chapter: Hebrew / Audio / MP3,
     Sefer Hamitzvos: English / Audio / MP3

Thursday Iyar 1, Second day of Rosh Chodesh 5703, 16th Day of the Omer **
Torah Lessons
(5703)
Chumash: K'doshim, Chamishi with Rashi.
Tehillim: 1-9.
Tanya: The said two (p. 235) to...Ahavat Olam ("eternal love")(p.237).

At a Farbrengen during the days of Sefira (at some time in the years 5651-5653, 1891-1893) someone said to my father, "The Alter Rebbe's Chassidim were always keeping count."

My father took a great liking to the saying, and he commented:

"That idea characterizes man's Avoda. The hours must be `counted hours,' then the days will be `counted days.' When a day passes one should know what he has accomplished and what remains yet to be done... In general, one should always see to it that tomorrow should be much better than today."


Day two of week 3

Gevurah of tiferet

For compassion to be effective and healthy it needs to be disciplined and focused. It requires discretion both to whom you express compassion, and in the measure of the compassion itself. It is recognizing when compassion should be expressed and when it should be withheld or limited. Discipline in compassion is knowing that being truly compassionate sometimes requires withholding compassion. Because compassion is not an expression of the bestower's needs but a response to the recipient's needs. Am I more compassionate with strangers than with close ones? If yes, why? Is the compassion coming from guilt? Does my compassion for others compromise my own needs? Am I helping others at the expense of helping myself? Perhaps the contrary is the case: Does my compassion for my family and close ones overshadow others needs? Is my compassion impulsive and careless? Do I assess the measure of compassion necessary for a given situation? Is it commensurate with the recipient's needs? Can I possibly be hurting him with my compassion? Does my compassion overwhelm others? Is it respectful? Do I give too much or too little? Do others take advantage of my compassionate nature? When I see a needy person do I impetuously express compassion out of guilt or pity without any discretion? Do I commit the "crime" of compassion by helping him with something harmful (give him money to buy a harmful substance etc.)? Do I apply myself to determine this person's needs and help him in the best way possible?

Exercise for the day: Express your compassion in a focused and constructive manner by addressing someone's specific needs.

From:
A Spiritual Guide to the counting of the Omer
Forty-Nine Steps to Personal Refinement
The Forty-Nine Days of Sefirah
by Simon Jacobson
$7.95 Soft Cover

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